Quit India Movement

The Quit India Movement or the India August Movement (August Kranti), was a civil disobedience movement launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Mahatma Gandhi) on 8 August 1942, during World War II, demanding an end to British Rule of India. The Cripps Mission had failed, and on 8 August 1942, Gandhi made a call to Do or Die in his Quit India speech delivered in Mumbai at the Gowalia Tank Maidan. Continue reading “Quit India Movement”

Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit

Vijaya Lakshmi Nehru Pandit (18 August 1900 – 1 December 1990) was an Indian diplomat and politician, the sister of Jawaharlal Nehru. She was the first Indian woman to hold a cabinet post. In 1937 she was elected to the provincial legislature of the United Provinces and was designated minister of local self-government and public health. She held the latter post until 1939 and again from 1946 to 1947. In 1946 she was elected to the Constituent Assembly from the United Provinces. Continue reading “Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit”

Karachi session of Indian National Congress 1931

The Gandhi Irwin Pact was endorsed by the Congress in the Karachi Session of 1931, that was held from March 26-31. Gandhi was nominated to represent Congress in the Second Round Table Conference. Just a week back, Bhagat Singh, Sukhdev and Rajguru had been executed. So, there was anger in the public whose point was that why Gandhi did accept to sign the pact. Continue reading “Karachi session of Indian National Congress 1931”

First speaker of Lok Sabha

Ganesh Vasudev Mavalankar (27 November 1888 – 27 February 1956) popularly known as Dadasaheb was an independence activist, the President (from 1946 to 1947) of the Central Legislative Assembly, then Speaker of the Constituent Assembly of India, and later the first Speaker of the Lok Sabha, the lower house of the Parliament of India. His son Purushottam Mavalankar was later elected to the Lok Sabha twice from Gujarat. Continue reading “First speaker of Lok Sabha”

Parliamentary Committees

The Parliament is too unwieldy a body to deliberate effectively the issues that come up before it. The functions of the Parliament are varied, complex and voluminous. Moreover, it has neither the adequate time nor necessary expertise to make a detailed scrutiny of all legislative measures and other matters. Therefore, it is assisted by a number of committees in the discharge of its duties. The Constitution of India makes a mention of these committees at different places, but without making any specific provisions regarding their composition, tenure, functions, etc. All these matters are dealt by the rules of two Houses.

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The Constituent Assembly of India

A constituent assembly is a body of representatives which is composed for drafting a constitution. In our times, we have recently seen how Nepal’s constituent assembly has drafted its constitution recently. We note that drafting the constitution is the only function of a constituent assembly. Once the constitution is ready and adopted; the assembly is dissolved. Further, since members of constituent assembly are representatives (elected or unelected); it’s a form of representative democracy. Continue reading “The Constituent Assembly of India”